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All Links are Live: Click on Titles to Access Websites

Selected Recorder Societies

American Recorder Society
Amherst Early Music/City Recorder
Westchester Recorder Guild
Recorder Society of Connecticut
Princeton Recorder Society

Boston Recorder Society
Early Music Foundation
Early Music Boston--R/EMM
Society of Recorder Players (UK)
Guild for Early Music

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Recorder Sales, Repairs, and Advice  

vonHuene Workshop: Early Music Shop of New England.

Perry Ritter: Highly recommended for recorking and replacement of key pads (no revoicing). 71 West 47th Street, Suite 704. Call for appointment: (212-302-5443).

Peter Bannon (845) 358-8227, 35 High Ave. Nyack, NY 10960, e-mail:  pbannon3@yahoo.com. Hours are irregular; call or e-mail for an appointment.

Courtly Music Unlimited: Elaine and Richie Henzler, Proprietors, run workshops, and sell "everything for the recorder enthusiast" (sheet music, instruments, accessories). The website has a free trill chart.

Magnamusic Distributors: Sheet music, recorders, recorder accessories.

The Recorder Shop: Sheet music, instruments, accessories, school music--ORFF.  Retail/Wholesale division of Dovehouse Editions Canada & Loux Editions.

Miscellaneous Resources

 

 

Gardane, A Repository of Music Sites: http://www.gardane.info

The Open University Music Education Page: http://www.openuniversity.edu/music-education, an excellent source for adults, kids, and teachers looking for in-depth information on all aspects of Early Music (actually, all music).

Singin' in the Rain as a beguine performed by the Taoyuan County Teacher's Recorder Orchestra: (click here)

The Recorder Page: A compendium of links, compiled by Australian Nicholas S. Lander. " . . .provides links to articles, lists, catalogues and databases concerning all aspects of the recorder worldwide".

Classical Net - Early Music Files and Links. Eclectic set of Links to early music festivals and concerts.
Early Music Resources on the Web. Links to early music instruments, festivals, ensembles, as well as some scholarly resources.
Musica Sacra et Profana. Great source for early music because it includes detailed descriptions.

Recorder Fingering is an interactive fingering chart for recorders. It lists basic fingerings, alternate fingerings and trill fingerings. The current version supports Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass recorders.If you're an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch owner, it is easily available on the iTunes App Store.

Irish and Fiddle Tunes for Recorder and Wedding Music for Recorder. Two collections of great tunes available on CD and sheet music. Available from Greenblatt and Seavey (click here for link).

Hear the Music Play: Contains hundreds of in-depth articles; people who love music have a place to discover expert advice on the top gear (for almost any discipline). https://hearthemusicplay.com

Music Education

Financial Resources for Future Musicians: Scholarships, Tips, and Money Management Secrets: musical training and financial help for high school and college students. Being a musician rocks, but plucking the extra bucks out of your wallet for instruments, training, and gigs can be a source of a lot of discordant emotions for students. Resources are available: https://couponfollow.com/research/future-musicians-guide

An Introduction to Playing the Recorder and A Continuing Course in Playing the Recorder, by Jen Anderson. These are a unique set of recorder instruction books that are suitable for adults students, as they contain familiar classical melodies, instead of the typical children's tunes used to learn the recorder. This past year, Ms. Anderson was awarded an Educational Outreach grant through the American Recorder Society to help secure copyright protection for these works. To obtain digital or hard copies, visit her website at: https://www.howsweetthesoundstudios.com.

S'Cool Sounds. Music in the Classroom—A Hands-On Experience

Nina Stern, Artistic Director; A Project of GEMS.
The S'Cool Sounds music program provides children in grades K-5 with life-long advantages for learning, growing, and living by teaching them to play a musical instrument in the classroom.

Learn to Play the Recorder. (Music Production Schools) A resource for musicians and educators working with children.
Recorder Technique: A Guide to the Basics and Beyond by Helen Hooker. 40 pages, €4.50 (approximately $5.00) available as a PDF download from www.helenhooker.co.uk/shop.

LearnRecorder, a website for recorder players of all levels. Dr. Tony Byers has also created a related recorder forum to help them reach a wider network of players, discuss upcoming workshops and recorder events, ask technical questions and share their recorder experiences.You can access it at http://RecorderForum.com.

David Coffin's Ace Recorder. David has been presenting Music Enrichment Programs in schools since 2000, but has been practicing the recorder since 1963. He built an app because he thinks it's an important tool for beginning recorder players. We all know the recorder is one of the easiest instruments to play and one of the hardest to play well. Check out his web site and see if his app will work for you.

Sheet Music Downloads

ARS Music Libraries: Over two hundred pieces of downloadable music are available on the ARS website. Under "Publications" menu item, look for "ARS Music Libraries Search & Download." From there, you may search for pieces based on number of players, composer, style, difficulty, occasion, and even keywords in the composer's or reviewer's descriptions. ARS members may download actual music and listen to recordings. Non-members may read the description of each piece, view a preview image, and listen to short sound clips for many pieces.
There are four libraries of music to choose from: Members' Library Editions: publications that you receive with three of the four issues, annually, of American Recorder magazine; Play the Recorder Month pieces: commissioned and published once per year by ARS to celebrate Play the Recorder Day/Month, starting in 2003; New Music for Recorder: pieces composed by contemporary composers specifically for recorder, with or without other instruments; Recorder Orchestra Library: music with five or more recorder parts, intended for 10 or more players. https://mms.americanrecorder.org/members/compositions/composition

Werner Icking Music Archive. Free sheet music downloads; a wide selection of early music.

Harmer Recorder Music: This site has many good things on it and many pieces for quartets and quintets. If you open the site in two windows you can pull the score up in one and the MIDI file to listen to it in the other window.

Playford English Country DanceTunes for Two: Soprano Recorders, Alto Recorders, Two Violins, Two Violas, Two Mandolins, Two Cellos, Two Bases. John Playford published “The English Dancing Master” in 1651. This monumental work featured the music for the tunes as well as instructions for performing the dances.This curated collection contains 37 of the tunes from the Playford book, arranged for two players. The melodies are on the top stave, and the harmony/backup is on the bottom stave. You could perform just the melody as a solo, if you are all by yourself. We have also included chords, just in case you have a guitar or ukulele handy.

Each Tunes for Two collection consists of individual spiral-bound duet books presented in score form with melody on the top line and harmony beneath so you can play each tune by yourself or with others. The tunes in this collection are laid out so that there are no page turns to interrupt the flow of your playing. http://www.greenblattandseay.com/book_42_playford.shtml

Jewish Recorder Player's Tune Book for Soprano. For a sample download and to order book: http://www.greenblattandseay.com/book_recorder_soprano_jewish_tunes.shtml

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